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Thursday 11

The Work and the Archive: Researching Edna O’Brien’s Papers at UCD

Edna O’Brien is one of the true giants of Irish literature. Her earliest work was banned by the Irish state, while sixty years later her novels continue to provoke controversy and debate. In recognition of her influential place in Irish culture and society, and to celebrate The Country Girls Trilogy as this year’s Dublin One City One Book, University College Dublin invites you to visit the James Joyce Library, where the the author’s papers (1996-2006) are held. Join Special Collections Librarian Evelyn Flanagan and Irish Research Council Scholar Dan O’Brien as they discuss archives in general and Edna O’Brien’s in particular. See how the letters light up the fiction, how the archive illuminates the work.

 

Coming of Age Novels

Edna O’Brien’s The Country Girls vividly captures the emotional texture of a young woman’s life in 1950s Ireland. Like all great coming of age novels – Jane Eyre; A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man – it distils into the story of one life the collective story of a generation. Join us to discuss O’Brien’s novel, and why coming of age stories are so powerfully resonant for readers. With authors Catherine Dunne and Alan McMonagle, chaired by Michael G. Cronin, lecturer in English at Maynooth University.

Michael G. Cronin is the author of Impure Thoughts: sexuality, Catholicism and literature in twentieth-century Ireland

Catherine Dunne is the author of ten published novels. Her one work of non-fiction, An Unconsidered People, is a social history that explores the lives of Irish immigrants in London in the 1950’s.Among her novels are: The Things We Know Now, which won the Giovanni Boccaccio International Prize for Fiction in 2013 and was shortlisted for Novel of the Year at the Irish Book Awards. The Years That Followed was published in 2016 and was longlisted for the International Dublin Literary Award. She is this year’s recipient of the Irish PEN Award for Contribution to Irish Literature.

Alan McMonagle has written for radio, published two collections of short stories: Liar, Liar and Psychotic Episodes – both of which were nominated for the Frank O’Connor Award – and contributed stories to many journals in Ireland and North America. His debut novel, Ithaca, was published in 2017 and was longlisted for the 2019 Dublin Literary Award.

Venue

Dublin City Library & Archive, 138-144 Pearse Street, Dublin 2

Time

April 11 at 6:30 pm

Tickets

Free

Booking

Booking essential

Girl Trouble: Controversy and The Country Girls

Edna O’Brien was one of five finalists in 2018’s ‘Clare’s Greatest Ever Person’ contest. Nominated by the public, even our President did not make the short list! That O’Brien is regarded today with such respect and appreciation by the people of Clare represents a significant change since she published her first novel in 1960, when the novel and its creator were widely condemned. A talk by Maureen O’Connor, who lectures in the School of English at University College Cork. 

O’Connor has published widely in Irish Studies and is the author of The Female and the Species: The Animal in Irish Women’s Writing (2010). She recently completed a book-length study of O’Brien’s fiction and is currently working on a monograph on nature and nation in the writing of Irish first-wave feminists.

All welcome.

Venue

Ballyroan Library, Orchardstown Avenue, Rathfarnham

Time

April 11 at 7:00 pm

Tickets

Free

Booking

Booking not necessary
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